The Apple

Stranded in a fog of words, loved him like a winter bird.
In the wastelands of San Diego and LA.
Big hair, bigger dreams.

Kay bye, small world.

The happiest place on earth.

The happiest place on earth.

Me - “Was Dyngus Day big in Buffalo?” (having no idea what it is, because we don’t celebrate that holiday out here)

Mother - “Yeah, I got hit with pussywillows all the time.”

S’cuse me?

So I called the clinic today and left a message. Never called me back. 

I can’t wait to be with my best friend, a glass of wine, her big bed, and having her paint my fingernails. Dark. Like my soul. 

Just kidding. Kinda. 

THUNDER MOUNTAIN AT DISNEYLAND IS REOPENED. I’m so excited. 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin
On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.
In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin

On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.

The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.

In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

(via salamcinema)

Today is the last day I’m giving the clinic to contact me. I had to take four days off starting tomorrow just in case they gave me the job so I could go to training. Their recommendation. I can’t afford that.

:( 

Whatever. Still have a free day at Disneyland, so I think I’ll cash that in tomorrow to make me feel betta. 

I was reading the comments on chescaleigh's response to man that was questioning her choice of marrying a white man, and I was slapped in the face with wisdom from a grandma. 

"Go where love makes you strong."

Damn, facebook grandma got me thinking. 

Despite mahu’s modern evolution, it was one of the unique benefits of growing up in a diverse place like Hawaii, specifically Oahu (which translates to “the gathering place”), where multiculturalism was the norm. It was empowering to come of age in a place that recognized that diversity existed not only in ethnicities but also in gender. There was a level of tolerance regarding gender non-conformity that made it safer for people like Wendi and me to exist as we explored and expressed our identities.

—Janet Mock, Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More